Te Kāhui o Matariki teaches us the science of the Earth system under another name – Mac Pro Tricks

Te Kāhui o Matariki teaches us the science of the Earth system under another name – Mac Pro Tricks
Te Kāhui o Matariki teaches us the science of the Earth system under another name – Mac Pro Tricks

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We have rapidly destroyed many of our natural ecosystems in Aotearoa, taking them from pristine to nearly dead. Now is the time to show that we are fast learners to help nature recover.

Opinion: Matariki is a very welcome and much needed new celebration for us as a nation. With the dawn of nature’s new year, therefore, the nights grow shorter and the days grow longer, it is a time of thanksgiving for the end of one cycle of life and the beginning of the next.

It’s the perfect time of year to sow seeds, plant crops, and start new businesses. Literally if we are farmers and gardeners working with other great gifts of nature like the land, water, plants and animals.

But also literally for those of us who buy all our food in stores. Our lives are completely dependent on nature and the life systems of the earth, whether we are rural or urban dwellers. Matariki is the time each year to remember our accreditation and renew our determination to restore our right relationship with nature.

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If you doubt our urgent need, watch The Breaking Boundaries: A Documentary on the Science of Our Planet on Netflix by Sir David Attenborough and Johan Rockstrom; Or read your book.

You will know Attenborough well; Rockstrom won’t, and yet he is a pioneer in one of the newest areas of Western science, dating back to the early 1980s. It is Earth system science that is rapidly advancing our society. understanding of how interdependent the survival of nature’s rich, complex and diverse systems is. They form the living earth, our life support system.

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Earth system science is mātauranga pākehā, western knowledge. But we are late to such ideas, though they have brought profound new insights even at the subatomic level. Long before us, indigenous peoples around the world understood the rhythms and cycles of life through intense observation of nature passed down from generation to generation. They never lose sight of the big picture, the systems and how to live their lives within them.

“When we try to choose something for ourselves, we find that it is related to everything else in the universe.”
-John Muir

Western science is slow to understand and benefit from this knowledge and wisdom. For example, the sixth (and current) round of United Nations climate crisis assessment reports relies more than ever on such sources.

Here at Aotearoa, we show how these two cognitive systems can inform each other as they strive together to understand and then solve complex problems in nature caused by us humans. Some of the best examples can be found in 11 National Science Challenges, each with decades-old, interdisciplinary, and well-funded goals to help us solve sustainability problems in nature, humans, and the interactions between them.

To do this, they combine Maori Maturanga and Maturanga Pakiha for the benefit of both and their ultimate goals. For example, the National Earth and Water Science Challenge does this by adhering to a “Maori (Tea or Maori) world perspective”. [that] It recognizes the interdependence and interdependence of all living and non-living things.” Taken together, the 11 challenges have produced this guide to such work in its broader fields.

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On the one hand, this is ancient wisdom. As early as 1900, Obirana Ngata, the leader and scholar of Ngati Puru, wrote about the Maaturanga Maori and the Maaturanga Pakiha and the great advantage of “casting our nets between them” rather than fishing in one or the other.

Another great example is Environment Aotearoa 2022, the latest edition of our triennial report on the health of ecosystems and the impact of human activities on them.

Te Ao Māori uses the scientific data we collected on 48 ecosystem health interventions as an overall framework; describe the relationships between them that determine the general state of nature; and then highlight how this contributes to our well-being: environmental, economic, social and cultural.

To do this, he uses Te Kāhui or Matariki (the Matariki star cluster) to present his clues. Each star represents a way we communicate with the environment. In tribute to the Maori New Year, Matariki commemorates loss and celebrates hope for the future.

These are examples of our special gift to the world of how we can ensure that indigenous and western knowledge enhance each other so that we can better rediscover our true relationship with nature.

Almost 30 generations ago, Aotearoa was the last great land mass on earth inhabited by humans. During that time we have dramatically altered these ecosystems, eventually severely exploiting and degrading them.

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Perhaps over time we begin to commit to helping nature recover. Thanks to Te Ao Māori and Mātauranga Māori, we have a wealth of primal knowledge to help guide us.

Unusual compared to indigenous knowledge in other parts of the world, it has been accumulated in a remarkably short period of time relative to an ecosystem. As such, Maori have extensive knowledge and narratives of how we have been rapidly destroying nature in many of our ecosystems, pushing them from pristine to nearly dead. Now is the time to show that we are fast learners to help nature recover.

All living earth communities face the same daunting challenge of survival. The first insight to understand the needs of every human being is that his life depends completely on nature. When nature is healthy, they are healthy.

Nature has given us this moment in Matariki every year to remind us of our symbiotic relationship and dependence on nature. TO Maori stories about the stars poetically tell us profound truths.

These are universal facts. Astronomers assume that star cave paintings, whether you call them Te Kāhui or Matariki, the Pleiades, Subaru (as the Japanese do), or other names in other cultures, the oldest verified source of human stories is 100,000 years old.

As John Muir, an American environmentalist born in Scotland in the early 20th century, wrote in his 1911 My first summer in the Sierra: “When we try to choose something for ourselves, we find that it is related to everything else in the universe.”